ANDREW SIMMS TESCOPOLY PDF

Tescopoly: How One Shop Came Out on Top and Why it Matters [Andrew Simms] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Tescopoly [Fellow Andrew Simms] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In his analysis, Andrew Simms, director of the acclaimed. Andrew Simms is the author of several books including the bestselling Tescopoly . He is a Fellow of nef (the new economics foundation), trained at the London.

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ANDREW SIMMS TESCOPOLY PDF

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Tescopoly by Andrew Simms. Tescopoly by Andrew Simms. In his analysis, Andrew Simms, director of the acclaimed think-and-do-tank the New Economics Foundation, and in association with tescopoly.

Paperbackpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Tescopolyplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Nov 21, Andy Wilkins rated it liked it. I think I would have preferred to have read this as an extended article as it contains a lot of repetition and information that I’d read elsewhere; the author seemed to labour the point tfscopoly bit too much.

However, the book certainly had an impact on me and will definitely change the way I think about where I do my shopping. Though Tfscopoly had thought about it previously, it really hit home to me how much Vancouver, BC is a “clone town” with its infamous 3 Starbucks on one intersection.

What is the point? How does this contribute to my life as a citizen of that city in the slightest? I was even inspired to write to the Vancouver city council enquiring how they decided to give planning permission because it seems to me that most shops that close down are goodies and most that open are expensive, boring and chains. Tescopolh this with Bellingham just over the border and you can see how cool and unique a city can be.

After reading, I really thought more about my community and how large chain stores suck out vibrancy and how much smaller independent stores contribute to your life as a citizen.

It also saddened me to hear how England which I left 10 years ago has changed on account of Tesco and their ilk and tecsopoly aggressive invasion of towns and countryside.

There were a few things that I couldn’t quite agree with, though. For example, he writes about the “high cost of low price” but then suggests shopping in local markets because they are cheaper. This seems a bit of a contradiction to me and as a shopper I’m confused about the true cost of things and it seems hard to know when you’re being ripped off and when you are providing the people who produced your item a decent living.

Also, I find some snobbery and assumption in this book. For example, on p. Or maybe, they were just picking up stuff on the way home from work or maybe they needed to buy quite a lot of stuff which they couldn’t carry?

If we are cutting out the supermarket middle-men, then why are they still so expensive? For that, I am most thankful to Andrew SImms. Mar 14, Evelyn rated it really liked it Shelves: Given Tesco’s recent revelations of overinflated profits and hideous accounting, it seemed appropriate to revisit Andrew Simms’ damning analysis of this superpower business.

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I first read Tescopoly when it was released back in and it made me rethink a lot of my consumer decisions, many of which I still stick by today. Simms does a fantastic job of picking apart the finer details of how Tesco sims so big and how it used its arsenal of bullying and super-buyer tactics to dominate cities and Given Tesco’s recent revelations eimms overinflated profits and hideous accounting, it seemed appropriate tesco;oly revisit Andrew Simms’ damning analysis of this superpower business.

Simms does a fantastic job of picking apart the finer details of how Tesco became so big and how it used its arsenal of bullying and super-buyer tactics to dominate cities and towns across the UK and undercut small, independent businesses and then put up costs once they had gone out of business.

Re-reading it now, much of the information doesn’t sound as shocking as we’ve come to understand more about how Tesco work, but it’s still an interesting book to pick up if you’d like some more references etc.

Aug 20, Ann rated it liked it. Too melodramatic to be taken seriously, which unfortunately diminishes the point. Oct 19, Stuart Hill rated it it was ok. Whilst this book had its moments it was too rambling and unfocused to provide a useful overview andrww Tesco.

Much of the material covers the impacts of globalisation, large corporations and climate change, information which will be familiar to those who have read any other literature on these subjects. Many books have discussed these topics in a more thorough and coherent fashion which made this account tesfopoly slightly redundant. Simms does make some interesting points about Tesco’s cavalier attitude Whilst this book had its moments it was too rambling and unfocused to provide a useful overview of Tesco.

Simms does make some interesting points about Tesco’s cavalier attitude to gaining planning permission and unwillingness to respond to criticism but his analysis is weakened by sections where he doesn’t supply enough solid evidence to support his statements. His description of small local stores comes across as rose tinted and I am sure that it wouldn’t be difficult to find examples where prices are high, stock choice is poor and service indifferent in contrast to the example described here as being at the centre of the community.

The impression given is that Simms’ findings are the result of confirmation bias, for example his account of visits to Simsm stores which are placed at the beginning and end of the book suggest that they have environments which are alienating, cause family arguments and headaches.

I would have certainly agreed that they are bland and uninspiring but this seemed somewhat exaggerated. Elsewhere the narrative goes off in tangents, with the author providing information about BP and a rival supermarket’s activities in South America which were rather peripheral to the main subject.

Andrew Simms’ book, Tescopoly

Ultimately the reader is left wondering whether Tesco operates in a fashion much different to any other large supermarket chain, as there are very few comparisons made between them in the text.

Despite containing some useful information, on the whole this was disappointing, as it failed to organise the research material effectively and would have benefitted by concentrating more on the supposed subject of the book.

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Mar 08, Tyne rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Even if you don’t shop at Tesco, or more importantly if you DO If you read this book it will or should!

Fight back against the greedy corporate giants and let’s get some individualism back into our towns. Watch out America, Tesco intends to invade you next! Not that you haven’t already got Walmart and all those others The guy who wrote this is up tesdopoly with Michael Moore in my opinion.

Found this to be a really interesting read. Read this to support my studies for my Economics A level aandrew a subject which is not supposed to be highly judgemental or take sides. This book contrasted well with that and enlightened me on the many different lights we can view global, dominating businesses in and the supporting arguments for either side.

Oct 21, Fiona Mosgrove rated it it was amazing. Aug 15, Ian rated it really liked it Shelves: An excellent expose of the supermarkets, and Tesco in general. How they’ve bought up the land and killed of the opposition. A real eye opener. Mar 26, Lynne rated it really liked it Shelves: A wee bit wordy in places, but I’ve never shopped in a Tesco since: Mar 27, Wilma Burns rated it really liked it. This makes you siimms about whether shopping in Tesco is a good idea – does one really want to add to their profits?

Aug 12, Nicci rated it really liked it. Jun 11, B rated it really liked it Shelves: May 09, Gemma Williams rated it really liked it. A readable and wide reaching look at the evil that is Tesco,which I will be doing my best to xndrew even more than I have previously.

Jul 08, Eleanor Black rated it liked it. Read this a while ago, it’s very much an eye opener into the aggressive business tactics of the major supermarket chains. Danny Jones rated it did not like it Feb 20, Mary Baldwin rated it really liked it Aug 11, Jessica Turner rated it really liked it Sep 06, Stuart Hatcher rated it liked it Feb 28, Graham Bailey rated it liked it Sep 13, Matteo Balzani rated it really liked it Jan 12, Carolin rated it it was ok Feb 07, Heather Connolly rated it really liked it Sep 07, Sally rated it liked it Mar 25, Seamus Enright rated it really liked it Jun 03, Wasiq Ashfaq rated it really liked it Jun 01, Ali rated it liked it Jul 08, Daniele Foa’ rated it liked it Oct 17, Rou Reynolds rated it liked it May 11, Kristy rated it really liked it Sep 16, There are tescopolu discussion topics on this book yet.

Andrew Simms is policy director of nef the new economics foundation the award-winning UK think-and-do tank, and head of nef’s Climate Change Programme. His latest book is Ecological Debt: Books by Andrew Simms. No trivia or quizzes yet. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

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